0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 32 Second

Aeva Milos | April 10, 2022

Welcome to The Fodder Blog’s new weekly segment ‘Weekly Top 10’, where our lovely team of writers share their top song picks for that week. If you’re in need of brand-new, spirited additions to your tumbleweed-ridden playlists, you’re in the right place! 

Aeva Milos shares a 10-song glimpse into her playlist to give you some new music and artists to listen to in April.

Ezra Furman — ‘Book of Our Names’

Released on: April 4

With magical tenderness and totality, Ezra Furman knows how to marry together religion, queerness and a sort of spiritual transcendence. Being both Jewish and trans, Furman calls this track “a protest song”, a song that echoes the names of everyone fighting an impenetrable battle, namely you, the listener. Singing through her recognisable reverb, Furman delivers a lyrical proclamation with angelic delicacy.  

Horsegirl — ‘World of Pots and Pans’

Released on: April 5

Horsegirl is a secret treasure box waiting to be found, a locked journal with a missing key. Floating through the underground Chicago scene, the trio tumble through ‘90s shoegaze rock while connecting to the existential longing of our young generation. Recalling the sound of Yo La Tengo and Blonde Redhead, Horsegirl are rising debutantes for the 2014 Tumblr girls and people who get a little happier when they cut their toast into triangles. 

BANKS — ‘Deadend’

Released on: April 6

BANKS has an imperceptible way of being both fragile and dominating, frightening and shy. Her newest album Serpentina is her first release as an independent artist. “I have control over every aspect of my career,” she told Vogue. Pairing a sultry piano with down tempos and heavy bass drops, ‘Deadend’ is a symbolic reclamation of power.   

Father John Misty — ‘The Next 20th Century’

Released on: April 4

Father John Misty knows the art of subtlety and dark humour. His title track off his album The Next 20th Century finds him singing about Nazis and weddings, Batman, and father/daughter dances. It’s an absurdist criticism of culture interwoven with the incessant reminder that love abounds and is almost necessary for us to survive. A piercing guitar solo echoes this, marking a cerebral turn in Father John Misty’s discography. 

Carla Geneve — ‘Residue’

Released on: April 8

Possessing a special kind of lyrical prowess, Australian-born Carla Geneve reflects on old and scattered ruminations of a lover mediated by accidentally dreaming about them. There is a personal, unfiltered side that Geneve leans into which makes the song appear like cathartic self-assurance. I don’t love you anymore / You don’t love me anymore, she repeats in a religious-like chant. 

Orville Peck — ‘Let Me Drown’

Released on: April 8

Embarking on a journey beyond the rose-coloured country flair of his debut album Pony, Orville Peck delivers an emotional ballad for ‘Let Me Drown’ which is accompanied by an exuberant orchestral composition. His signature vocal twang still permeates through the track as he mourns a lost love. “There’s definitely a theme of breaking free,” Peck told Junkee. It’s a raw and cathartic delivery for the singer.  

Spacey Jane — ‘It’s Been A Long Day’

Released on: April 8

Spacey Jane has seen a meteoric rise within the Australian music scene after they were the highest-ranked Australian act for triple j’s Hottest 100 in 2020. Their latest single ‘It’s Been A Long Day’ features their signature surf rock and focuses on the challenges of anxiety and the inevitability of changing relationships.

Maggie Rogers — ‘That’s Where I Am’

Released on: April 8

While studying at NYU, Maggie Rogers found her breakthrough after she managed to stun Pharrell Williams into silence while they were listening to her song ‘Alaska’. Since then, Maggie Rogers has only continued to push the boundaries of her sound. ‘That’s Where I Am’ finds her leaning heavily into percussive elements while continuing to experiment with electronic distortion, texturing her music with a darker and more sophisticated sound.

Wet Leg — ‘Ur Mum’

Released on: April 4

It comes as no surprise anymore that TikTok has the ability to make (or break) music careers. Wet Leg, an indie rock band from the UK, are the latest in the procession. Possessing a witty French new-wave charm, their latest album recalls the works of Nouvelle Vague and Charlotte Gainsbourg—a sort of Parisian sarcasm that can only be paired with red lipstick stains and cigarettes. 

Lime Cordiale — ‘Facts of Life’

Released on: April 7

At this point, Lime Cordiale are undeniable figureheads of Australian indie sound. The two brothers have dominated triple J music charts since 2019 and continue to do so. In this track, the duo romanticise summer heat and living with carefree abandon—a perfect track to listen to as we get into the colder months and you want to cling to the last few rays of warmth. 

About Post Author

Aeva Milos

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Recommended Articles