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Maia Everist-Migliore | March 13, 2022

Welcome to The Fodder Blog’s new weekly segment ‘Weekly Top 10’, where our lovely team of writers share their top song picks for that week. If you’re in need of brand-new, spirited additions to your tumbleweed-ridden playlists, you’re in the right place! 

This week, check out Maia Everist-Migliore’s selection of new releases for the variety of songs you could jam out to.

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard — ‘The Dripping Tap’

Released on: March 8

This song is over 18 minutes long but from the very first second, I knew it was going to be something I love. The boys managed to carry energy throughout the whole song, with the funky, somewhat discordant guitar over relentless drums. It may not be everyone’s thing but if you’re in the mood for a raucous, largely instrumental, 18-minute ride, this may be the song for you.

Dominic Fike & Zendaya — ‘Elliot’s Song’ (From HBO Original Series Euphoria)

Released on: March 4

This song, first heard in Euphoria’s season finale, left many fans divided. While I didn’t particularly welcome the song in the middle of the episode (because by God did it drag), the message of the song is beautiful. Fike and Zendaya’s voices meld gorgeously in this released cover and makes for a soft, heartfelt piece.

SUNMI — ‘Oh Sorry Ya’

Released on: March 8

Sunmi was originally a Korean idol, having made her debut in 2007 with the group Wonder Girls. She has now been working as a solo artist for a few years and ‘Oh Sorry Ya’ joins the rest of her discography as another fun pop bop.

Stromae — ‘Fils de joie’

Released on: March 3

My high school French isn’t good enough to properly translate what Stromae is saying but you don’t need to understand the language to appreciate the song. Violin first introduces the song and continues to be used along with the beat; joined by Stromae’s sometimes warbling vocals, they come together to make a beautiful song and one that’s worth a listen.

Carson Coma — ‘Immunissá válunk’

Released on: March 7

This song, by the Hungarian rock band Carson Coma, had me dancing around my room, having an absolute groove. I love a good build up with a satisfying beat drop that you can jump around to. The band is influenced by music of the ’60s and the current alternative tracks, and so has managed to create a humorous, youthful and upbeat sound.

Sadurn — ‘golden arm’

Released on: March 7

Slowing it down with this one, a chill beat and beautiful guitar opens the song before the vocalist Genevieve DeGroot’s gorgeous voice comes in. The four-piece band comes together to build a song that, at least to me, feels like a soft hug, a shared hot cup of tea, or a snuggle in bed under warm covers on a rainy day. It doesn’t feel like a happy song, but it is certainly a comforting one.

Mandy Moore — ‘In Real Life’

Released on: March 8

Actress and musician Mandy Moore is coming out with a new album on May 13 (in America) and has also released tour dates for a North American tour later this year. ‘In Real Life’ is the first song of the album of the same name, featuring some great strings accompanying drums, a keyboard, an electric guitar and Moore’s sweet vocals.

Spiritualized — ‘The Mainline Song / The Lockdown Song’

Released on: March 7

The slow build at the beginning, including the sound of a train, keeps going until nearly at the two-minute mark, where it levels out only for it to start building again. Finally, at around the three-minute mark, vocals join the joyous amalgamation of sound. Spiritualized takes inspiration from Phil Spector and the Velvet Underground, which can be found in this song, with its smooth, somewhat psychedelic sound and definite groove.

Aldous Harding — ‘Fever’

Released on: March 8

Ever since ‘The Barrel’, I’ve been entranced by this New Zealand singer-songwriter, Aldous Harding. And ‘Fever’, while a very different vibe, is no exception. This track is imbued with energy, with Harding calling out during the song, demanding your attention. It features simple, fun piano, before about halfway where it becomes something melancholic, only to pick back up a few moments later. Another great piece from Harding.  

Leyla McCalla — ‘You Don’t Know Me’

Released on: March 8

This song, and the album of the same name to which it belongs, first began during Leyla McCalla’s research on a theatre piece. She was listening to the radio recordings from Radio Haiti, which then inspired this album. The music throughout the album is reflecting on McCalla’s experiences as a Haitian American woman while also talking about the ideas of freedom of speech and human rights. She’s created a stunning sound with beautiful, thoughtful and impactful messaging.

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Maia Everist-Migliore

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